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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
on a number of occasions. it is important to preserve the bill of rights. i think that benjamin franklin -- he said those who will sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither. the fact is that this is a real problem. i see it being a much greater problem. the think tanks that have looked at the issue, unfortunately, have said that in the next 10 years, there will be not one, but two dirty nuclear bombs exploded in the united states. i hope they're wrong. that is what the statistics show. if that does happen, god forbid, i believe that our fundamental democracy will be under the greatest attack it has ever experienced. as a matter of fact, one of the issues we're looking at in the aba is what would be the aba's response in the event there was a dirty nuclear bomb and habeas corpus was suspended in the united states, as it was by lincoln and by roosevelt? a lot of people don't remember that and don't know it. england, i was in england talking to their lawyers. i was talking to their security people. they don't have a constitution. they have much different ability to hold people for longer per
thomas jefferson by benjamin franklin or charles carroll, but other happiness can occur through the very pursuit of domains country and names. in the moral and practical habits that are so crucial in business, trade and market economies are generally. in much of western europe if not most of western europe, a contrary attitude has long been characteristic. if people are to live fulfilling lives, as far as consistent with maintaining minimal incentives of wealth creation, the attitude is people are provided and protected with risk. institutionally that translates squarely into the model. that's interesting is there is very little evidence that such policies actually help make people happy. as i illustrate in "becoming europe," many people on long-term health care are generally less happy than those who are in the same income, but don't do it through author payment, instead do it through work in a job. there's been lots of studies in both america and europe to talk about these in the book. we have to be careful not to read to much in the studies because correlation is not causality. they d
jefferson and benjamin franklin were charles carroll. but although realizations of happiness can occur through the very pursuit of the means that enable us to engage in these interests. in the development, for example, of the moral and practical habits that are so crucial for success in business, trade, and in market economies more generally. now, in much of western europe, if not most of western europe, i contrary attitude has long been characteristic of the economic culture. it is this. people are to live a fulfilling lives, as far as is consistent with maintaining minimal incentives to encourage some wealth creation, the attitude is that people need to be provided with things and protected from risk. institutionally that translates squarely into the european social model. what is interesting, however, is , there is very little evidence that such policies actually help make people happy. as i illustrate in "becoming europe," many people who are, for example, on long-term welfare are generally less happy than those who earn the same income but who don't do it through a welfare payment
no idea that the computer and computer chips would come into existence. even benjamin franklin, i doubt very much -- [laughter] -- tha daddy ever in his wildest fantasy imagined the things we could do today. if they had used terms that were more specific than they did, we wouldn't have been given the opportunity to define it with experience. and so they did a mixture. they did a mixture of some very, very clear things. you can't do this. one thing we forget about today, you can't quarter the militia in people's homes, except in times of war. that's pretty specific, all right? but there were many other things that the left generally. and i think that's why the document has lasted. they gave us the concept, and we are guided by the concept, but we're not wedded to a fixed time. >> and what worries you about the constitution? are there any trends, issues you might have your eye on? [laughter] >> i'm a lawyer. many, but i don't think this is the floor to really talk about it. but i will talk about one thing that the reason elections have given me gratification about. our forefathers were ci
in these acts? one of the acts is public libraries. benjamin frank lip has come -- franklin has come to this country smuggling a bible, smuggling a bible under the seat of a chair and tells benjamin at one point that one of the things, most important things you can be is a printer. and this is the idea that when england at that time when his father came over, when the franklins came over, in england there were only two printing presses, one in oxford, one in london. and franklin was very interested in these acts, these definitions of who we were as a people. so when franklin creates a free library in philadelphia, this is seen as an act of resistance, an act against the british. it's a thumbing of the nose against the british. when noah webster goes and literally crusades for literacy, this is his way of not only to sell dictionaries and books that he, spelling books and such, but it was also part of these acts against the british. and coup wright is another. -- copyright is another. webster is one of the early people with this. and the early presidents are all very much aware of thi
on the bus and drove all the way back i went to work the next day. there is a wonderful story about benjamin franklin at constitution hall in the very early early stages of our deliberations. a crowd was always gather and as mr. franklin was leaving the hall one night in philadelphia a woman yelled out to him mr. mr. president what would it be if we decided it would be a monarchy or would it be a republic? he thought for a moment and he yelled back to the woman, maam it would be a republic if we can keep it. we have been charged with keeping this republic now for 200 years and there are only two ways to do it. either to fight for it or to work at its. it's incumbent upon all of us, all of us to do one or both and he no one could possibly be in a more important decision to lead the way then the 100 united states senators, each with their own number, each with a the recognition that they have entrusted to do all that we can to keep it. thank you all very very much. [applause] [applause] thank you very much. do we have time for questions? yes. >> senator thank you for your remarks. you mentione
's a wonderful story about benjamin franklin at constitution hall in the early stages of our deliberations. a crowd would always enter, a woman yelled out, mr. franklin, what will it be if you decided a monarchy or a republic? a thought for a moment and go back to the woman, it will be a republic if we can keep it. we've been charged with keeping this republic for 200 years. there's only two ways to do it, either to fight for it or to work at it. it's incumbent upon all of us to do one or both. and no one could possibly be a more important decision than the 100 united states senators, each with their own number, each with the recognition they've entrusted to do all that we can to keep it. thank you all very, very much. [applause] >> david, do we have time for questions? >> senator, thank you for your remarks. you mention to hazard a guess to a happen in the next 36 hours to amend the filibuster rule. if you get away from the filibuster, where if you said you're going to to do it, you have to stand your ground and do it. hasn't happened and i were threatening filibusters of females is holdi
benjamin franklin, in his own words, said in the beginning, when we were sensible of danger, we had daily prayer in this room. our prayers were heard. there were graciously answered. janice and i and our other colleagues have seen the prayers answered. it is what brings us together. thank you for joining with us today. [applause] >> thank you, and good morning, mr. president, madam first lady, mr. vice-president, senators, distinguished guests. i am so delighted to be here this morning with all of you. it is such an honor to co-chair the house congressional prayer breakfast with my friends and colleagues, especially congressman at louie gohmert. this is the only chairmanship speaker boehner cannot remove him from for bad behavior. [laughter] only god can do that. [laughter] today's breakfast offers an opportunity for us to set aside political labels and come together to be inspired and pray for the critical issues that are facing our nation and the world. i was elected to congress in the middle of one of the most bitter, rancorous, and divided. it's in our nation's history. in the midst o
and benjamin franklin but it can occur through the pursuit of the means to enable us to engage these interest of the moral and practical habits that are so crucial for success in business and trade and market economies. in much of western europe it is characteristic of a culture that if people are to live fulfilling lives as is consistent to encourage wealth creation people need to be provided with things that goes into the european social model but there is little evidence of makes people happy many on long-term welfare are generally less happy than those who earn the same income but not zero welfare payment but there have been studies done on this behalf to be careful not to read too much because correlation is not causality but they do suggest economic cultures which prioritize institutions focused on redistribution from the top down in the effort to realize ever greater equality and stability are much less successful in helping people to flourish as they ought to. franklin wrote never made a man happy but never will it but how one achieves wealth or gains in income does seem when we think
. >> hey, sue. benjamin franklin said man who is rich is a man who is contented. but does money make you contented or happy? a new research spectrum group asked people worth $500,000 or more, does money make you happy? in fact it said it didn't. only 21% of those affluent groups said it made them happy. twice that number, 44% said in fact it did not make you happy but what is interesting is it depend on how wealthy you are. when you look at the these groups divide need three groups, those worth $500 thousand or more, 5 mill or more, 16 months or more fairly low number says money can make you happy. but a much higher number and wealthy that 5 million or more group said sed that money does make you happy. so the more money you have, the more likely you are going to agree that money makes you happy. to me, happiness is not the goal of wealth. when asked what it means to be rich in america, a vast majority, look at that, over 80% said that more security was in fact the goal of being rich. happiness in a distant second and ranking third at 33%. wealthy taking a very practical view of what mon
that the computer and computer chips would exist. even benjamin franklin, i doubt very much that he knew. [laughter] that he ever in his wildest fantasies imagined what we had today. it debuted terms that are more specific than they did, we wouldn't have been given the opportunity to define this so they did a mixture of some very clear things. you can't quarter the militia in people's homes except in times of war. that is pretty specific. but there were many other things they talked about generally. the document gave us a concept. we are guided by that concept. >> what worries you about the constitution? are there any trends that you might have your eye on? >> are you a lawyer? i didn't think you were. >> there are many. but i don't think it's fair to really talk about it. but i will talk about one thing that is the recent direction. our forefathers were citizens. they were people who were of the community and they were the envy of that society and they were businessmen, very successful farmers. they were people who had high education. from the various things that they saw working, starting with th
money can't buy happiness? rich people. that's who says it. robert? >> hey, maria. thanks. benjamin franklin says a rich man is he who is content. spectrum just surveyed those worth $500,000 or more and the vast majority said it can't buy happiness. 44% saying no. what can money buy? when asked what it means to be rich in america, a vast majority 84% said it could bring more security. only 34% said it brings more happiness. and 33% said more responsibility. americans taking a practical view of what money can and can't buy. the financial definition of rich is also very subjective. when asked what income you need to be rich in america, the lesser wealthy said $250,000 or more. and a little bit more said $450,000. the richer folks, those worth $5 million or more said it takes more. only 18% said $250,000 and a vast majority 45% said it takes at least $450,000 a mor. so in the end, enough is never enough at least not to the content. >> so why did the rich people always say it? >> you know, i think the wealthier you are, the environment you live in makes you believe that it takes a lot m
-year-old benjamin franklin stood up, was recognized -- 80-year-old benjamin frankly stood up, was -- franklin stood up, was recognized by george washington, and franklin, of course he had enjoyed life a great deal, but at that point he's overweight, arthritis, gout, a lot of trouble. but his mind was quite sharp. two to three years away from meeting his maker, but he pointed out, we've been going for nearly four, five weeks, we have more no's than ayes on virtually every vote. he -- no's than ayes -- noes than ayes on virtually every vote. franklin wrote out his whole speech. that is part of our archives. but he said in his own words, how has it happened, sir, that we have not once thought of humbly applying to the father of lights to illuminate our understanding? in the beginning contest with great britain when we were sensible of danger we had daily prayer in this room. our prayers, sir, were heard and they were graciously answered. and he goes on to point out that all of them should be able to remember specific prayers that they had prayed that were answered. and then he s
is benjamin franklin? uh, benjamins for $1,200, please. uh, who is harrison? uh, benjamins for $1,600, please. and that would be benjamin disraeli. two clues left, john. uh, $2,000 for benjamins, please. who is benjamin britten? and now the last clue in tales of adventure... and once again, i can say i bet you saw the movie-- "papillon." "papillon." all right, elissa, $8,200, patrick, $11,600, john, $13,400. remember, the winner goes on to play as a semi-finalist and there are those four wild card spots for the high scorers among nonwinners. here's the final jeopardy! subject-- u.s. states. we'll reveal the clue when we come back after this. how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great th. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed: the official retirement age. ♪ to enjoy all of these years. ♪ diarrhea, gas, bloating? yes! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three st
is why benjamin franklin, his own words, his own handwriting said in the beginning contest with great britain when we were sensible of danger, we had daily prayer in this room. our prayers were heard, and they were graciously answered. janice and i and our other colleagues have seen those prayers answered, and it's what brings us together. thanks for joining with us today. [applause] >> thank you, and good morning. mr. president, madam first lady, mr. vice president, senators, distinguished guests, i'm so delighted to be here this morning with all of you. it's such an honor to co-chair the house congressional prayer breakfast with my friend and colleague, congressman louie gohmert. his colleagues said this is the only chairmanship that speaker boehner can't remove him from for bad behavior. [laughter] only god can do that. [laughter] you know, today's prayer breakfast offers an opportunity for us to set aside political labels and come together to be inspired and pray for the critical issues that are facing our nation and the world. i was elected to congress in the middle of one of the
university and its 150th anniversary. benjamin franklin said tell me, and i forget. teach me and i will remember. involve me and i will learn. through learning, students' lives have been changed for the better for more than a century at emporia state university. this is an historic occasion, the 150th anniversary. and i want to recognize the significant impact that emporia state has had on our state and nation. 1863, emporia state was founded as a school for training teachers. back then it was known as kansas normal school, and in its first year the present and only teacher, l wr* -- taught 18 students. at the university's first commencements president kellogg presented diplomas to its two graduates: mary jane watson and allen plum. in the years that followed it was faced with many challenges: tornadoes, fires, lack of funding. but the university survives and continued each and every year to change the lives of its students. today 6,500 students from 45 states and 5 countries are enrolled at empo r*eu a state university. ranked as a tier 1 university by "u.s. news and world report"
down. and you had benjamin franklin coaching him. so there's this package of benj coaching him. lot of these guys did it on purpose. >> fdr followed in that great tradition, he created the word "iffy" and when he used finalized in a second state of the union address critics went crazy. >> that was eisenhower. >> finalize? >> finalize and a lot of presidents got in trouble for example, fdr once talked about chisellers in a speech and the critics got crazy about that. woodrow wilson is the first president who really gets in trouble for using slang and wilson had been a football coach at two colleges so wilson would say we got to get a move on, we got to get going out there and he would talk to the country as if he was a coach. the critics would say he should never use this kind of english. lot got in trouble including george w. bush for imbetter and things like that. >> keeping the ball rolling william harrison there was a ball. >> they moved from town to town. >> for what purpose? >> to create buzz. it was a campaign game mick, a giant ball made with paper mac hi er and wire. the ear
-famous scientists and inventors like benjamin franklin, thomas edison and jonas sulk. but countless more american scientists who are not world famous nonetheless have been changing this world. you have heard of william burroughs, john bardene or ruth vinarito? according to the national inventors hall of fame, mr. burroughs invented the electronic calculator. mr. bardene delofled the transistor and helped create silicon valley in california. and we can thank chemist ruth vinarito for developing wrinkle-free cotton which is in the shirts many americans wear today, including mine. but as -- is america as innovative as it used to be? some wonder if america's greatest technologicallyal achievements are behind us and if other nations like china and india will soon surpass us or perhaps already have. some nations are creating environments so attractive to global manufacturers that companies have relocated much of their activities on foreign soil. our global trade imbalance is growing as we export less and import more. and today this imbalance includes many high-backed products. other nations are changin
nothing. zero. benjamin franklin once said, "a man who achieves makes many mistakes, but he never makes the big of the mistake of all -- nothing doing." close quote. republicans appear poised to make the big of the mistake of all. they are prepared to let the sequester's painful cuts take effect. across the country, air traffic controllecontrollers, f.b.i. agd others will be furloughed. boyce and girls will be kick -- boys and girls will kicked off head start. these cuts will start real quickly. the notices will go off in 90 days cutting off all contractual payments, whoever gets a notice. so, within a matter of weeks, we're going to feel these cuts and feel them really, really painfully. mr. president, 70,000 boys and girls will be kicked off head start. thousands of researchers working to cure diseases -- cancer, alzheimer's, and the other dread diseases -- will be laid off. hundreds of thousands of defense department employees will take forced furloughs. a hardship for their families and a threat to national security. make sure everyone understands -- this is not president obama's se
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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